right :Morning in the Mountains, left :Evening in the Mountains|Yokoyama Taikan
Exhibition
Autumn Exhibition / 2024
Main Exhibition Room

The 110th Anniversary of the Re-Establishment of Japan Art Institute Pioneers of Japanese Painting

Date: Sat, Aug 31 ‐ Sat, Nov 30, 2024

The Japan Art Institute is an art organization that was established in 1898, mainly by Okakura Tenshin, who had the ideal to create a Japanese painting style proper for a new age. Yokoyama Taikan, Shimomura Kanzan, Hishida Shunso and others participated in the Institute to realize Tenshin’s ideal, and proceeded to study Japanese painting without recoiling. They tried to establish new techniques by eliminating traditional drawing, and getting rid of any contours, but this attempt was not well received at that time. The Institute was for a time extinguished spontaneously.
In 1914, however, the Institute was re-established with Taikan and Kanzan playing the main roles, in order to accomplish the intention of Tenshin, who had died in the previous year. In the re-established Institute, each painter trained himself in his own way, and released various masterpieces and notable works.
This exhibition, in commemoration of the 110th anniversary of the re-establishment of Japan Art Institute, will display works by Inten painters, including Shunso, who flourished in its early period. They may be called pioneers of Japanese painting, which largely influenced the Japanese art world. We hope you will fully enjoy their masterpieces.

Hishida Syunso
"Cat and Plum Blossoms"
(1906)
Taikan Special Exhibition Room
Additional Exhibitions

Selected Works from the Taikan Collection - Autumn -

Date: Sat, Aug 31 ‐ Sat, Nov 30, 2024

Selflessness, which made Taikan popular, Dragon and Mt. Fuji and Autumn: Four Seasons of the Sea, showcased for the 50th anniversary of his art career, Dismally Cold Wind, whose title is the same as that of the last work he showed for the Inten, and other masterpieces will be exhibited. The folding screen, Autumn Leaves, which is exhibited every autumn—and only in autumn—should be considered unmissable.

Yokoyama Taikan
"Autumn Leaves"
(1931)
About Us